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Stone powder

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Les Symonds
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Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:14 am
Location: North Wales, UK

Stone powder

Postby Les Symonds » Sun Mar 19, 2017 4:40 pm

I'm interested in using stone dust/powder for filling cracks, and often see it used on this forum. However, I rarely see reference to it in the UK. Any info about stone types, suppliers etc would be appreciated.
Les

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Curt Fuller
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Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:07 am
Location: North Ogden, Utah

Re: Stone powder

Postby Curt Fuller » Sun Mar 19, 2017 9:35 pm

Les, as I'm sure you know by now, I'm a scavenger and a scrounger. I've seen crushed stone on the https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/47 ... tone+inlay but I don't know if you want to deal with an across the ocean company. I'm sure there are places that sell it somewhere in your neck of the woods though. Where ever you've been getting your polished stone cabochons should be able to supply you with crushed stone also. I found some raw turquoise stones at a yard sale. I made a small hand held crusher by using a piece of 1" black pipe about 8" long with a cap on one end. Inside of that I have a longer piece of 1/2" pipe about 12" longwith a cap on the end of that. I put small pieces of turquoise in the big pipe and just keep hitting it with the capped end of the smaller pipe, sort of like a mortar and pestle, until it gets crushed down to the size I want. The pipe contains it so it doesn't fly all over.

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Les Symonds
Posts: 1284
Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:14 am
Location: North Wales, UK

Re: Stone powder

Postby Les Symonds » Mon Mar 20, 2017 12:36 am

Thank you, Curt, that is very helpful and much appreciated. Out of interest, how aggressive is this stuff on the turning tools?

Les

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Chuck Jones
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Re: Stone powder

Postby Chuck Jones » Mon Mar 20, 2017 1:08 am

Les, you probably have already tried some internet searching. Here are a few links I found with one quick search on crushed stone for inlay.

Amazon

Etsy (international ??)

woodturningvideosplus.com

I ran in to tell my wife about Curt's hot tip on the crusher. She crushes a lot of glass for frit. She reminded me that she already uses one I made her several years ago. Getting old is fun. She also said there is a bit of a problem with a small amount of the metal grinding off the pipe which isn't good when the frit hits the kiln. She had been using a magnet to get the metal out, but says it's doesn't get it all. I guess that's not a problem with woodturning.

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Les Symonds
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Joined: Fri Oct 04, 2013 3:14 am
Location: North Wales, UK

Re: Stone powder

Postby Les Symonds » Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:14 am

Thanks for the links, Chuck....one of my problems is that this is new territory for me and I don't really know what I'm looking at. I've just found a UK supplier of powdered frits, so I've ordered some samples in a few different colours. Meanwhile, I'll make a pestle and mortar for crushing stones and see how fine I can get them.
Les

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Curt Fuller
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Joined: Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:07 am
Location: North Ogden, Utah

Re: Stone powder

Postby Curt Fuller » Mon Mar 20, 2017 8:46 pm

Les Symonds wrote:Thank you, Curt, that is very helpful and much appreciated. Out of interest, how aggressive is this stuff on the turning tools?

Les

Les, the finer the stone, the less aggressive it is on the tools. I found that using carbide cutters works much better than HSS. But it takes a tole on the carbide too and will eventually ruin the edge on the cutters. I think that the best results come from painting or somehow coloring the background and then adding the stone mixed in clear epoxy. Get it as close to flush with the finished surface as you can so you don't have to remove much stone. Then polish like acrylic so the stone and the background color show through the clear epoxy. If you use colored epoxy, try to keep it as translucent as possible to let the stone show through.

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Steve Schlumpf
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Re: Stone powder

Postby Steve Schlumpf » Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:32 am

Les, you have probably already searched YouTube but thought I would throw a link to you in case you missed it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YZF5A2_-0E

I have not used rock/stone as filler yet but have always been under the impression that the rock/stone you are using should be soft enough that it can be sanded - such as turquoise, malachite or amazonite.
Steve

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Joe Fleming
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Re: Stone powder

Postby Joe Fleming » Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:14 pm

Try shopping at a jewelry supply store, or a gem and mineral shop.

Joe Fleming, San Diego


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