Turning of the Week
Image
Newest Challenge
Image

Have you checked out the
Gallery yet? Our members have posted some of their very best work for you to see – all in one convenient location!

Bowl Finishes Question

bob baccus
Posts: 602
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:47 am

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby bob baccus » Thu Apr 27, 2017 3:00 am

Wood feel is a consideration for sure with some pieces. I like to apply an old time spit finish using softened carnuba and ice water on some pieces not for sale. It requires a very hard wood(harder than most walnuts) to work for me. Feels great and changes the color less than any finish I can find--all done on the lathe of course (I'm very lazy). My biggest prob. with poly is the plastic look and the issue of repair having no chemical melting to the old film. I also find the precat lac. keeps curing for days producing a very durable film--even hard to wet sand after a week. Forgive the typing--still fighting lyme. Did you ever try the epoxy soak trick? would love some feedback if you did. Dizzy in E. Texas.

User avatar
Mike Cruz
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: Western Maryland

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby Mike Cruz » Thu Apr 27, 2017 7:07 am

No, I haven't. I put those pieces on the back burner for now. Just about any 'hardening' method would take more time than I've had as of late. When it comes time to do those pieces, I'll revisit the thread.
Wood hoarder, and proud of it!
GO-TO caliber: 357 mag

User avatar
Bob Rotche
Advisory Board Chairman
Posts: 2669
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2013 10:18 pm
Location: Blacksburg, VA

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby Bob Rotche » Thu May 04, 2017 7:36 am

Mike, I think you've posted it before, but would you mind sharing your formula for your finish? I would like to give it a try.
____________________________________________________
Don't sweat it- it's just wood and it really does grow on trees!

User avatar
Mike Cruz
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: Western Maryland

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby Mike Cruz » Thu May 04, 2017 6:40 pm

Depending on the wood (how dense it is, and how easily it will soak up finish), I mix good old regular poly (40%), walnut oil (40%), and mineral spirits (20%). That is for wood that soaks up finishes easily (porous, punky, etc). For denser woods, I will do 33%, 33%, 33%...to get it to soak in easier.

The point of my making my own is that DO is 10% hardener, 40% oil, and 50% mineral spirits. That means it is super thin. That also means that 50% of what you put on evaporates away. That also means that only 20% of what you applied is actually protecting the wood. With what I do, you end up with 50% hardener. That tends to harden up the wood fibers themselves, and makes for a tougher finish (than DO), but not as tough as straight poly...
Wood hoarder, and proud of it!
GO-TO caliber: 357 mag

User avatar
Chuck Jones
Site Admin/Founder
Posts: 2906
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2013 9:48 pm
Location: West Tennessee
Contact:

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby Chuck Jones » Fri May 05, 2017 10:03 am

Mike, it occurs to me that I don't remember you, or anyone else, specifying the type of poly; gloss, satin, or otherwise.

I'm very unlearned when it comes to finishes. After several years of tinkering with turning, I'm just now getting round to studying and experimenting with finishes.

User avatar
Mike Cruz
Posts: 3167
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: Western Maryland

Re: Bowl Finishes Question

Postby Mike Cruz » Fri May 05, 2017 1:29 pm

Always gloss! You can take the sheen off of gloss, but you can't add it to satin/semi-gloss. And that also applies to when you are looking for a not so shiny finish on a woodworking project. If you are going to apply 3 coats of poly/lacquer/whatever, either: Apply all three coats of clear gloss and scuff up the surface at the end with fine steel wool or pad, OR apply the first two coats with gloss, then the last coat with satin/semi-gloss. The reason is that satin and semi-gloss have solids in them to make them not 'shiny'. If you apply 3 coats of them, you lose the richness of the wood. If you only use it for the last coat, you will just take the shine away, but the wood will still be warm and you can still see the details in the wood.
Wood hoarder, and proud of it!
GO-TO caliber: 357 mag


Return to “Tips, Tools, & Techniques”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest